Targa personalizzata: un "miracolo" tutto italiano

Qualche tempo fa ho letto sulla rivista Quattroruote un articoletto, breve in realtà, in cui si riportavano le lamentele di un lettore nei confronti delle Motorizzazioni civili. L'argomento del contendere era la famigerata targa personalizzata, concetto che a quanto pare esiste ma "non si vede".

Il Codice della Strada prevede infatti dal lontano 2003 (vedi art. 100 comma 8) la possibilità di richiedere una targa personalizzata per il proprio veicolo, al momento dell'immatricolazione. La targa deve avere la struttura classica delle targhe civili italiane, ovvero due caratteri - tre cifre - due caratteri, e non deve essere già utilizzata da qualcun altro. Stando alla legge sembrano esserci tutti i presupposti per effettuare la richiesta, pagare il costo aggiuntivo dovuto alla personalizzazione e per ricevere il desiderato oggetto. Il lettore si lamentava del fatto che la Motorizzazione rispondesse che la legge c'era, ma che tecnicamente non si era in grado di farlo. Ancora.
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Browser Standards: HTML5 Test - Best Results

Since the number of the available browser is constantly growing, it becomes every day more important to adhere to international standards. Until the last year, every developer was interested about how much a browser supported the XHTML 1.0 or 1.1 specifications and the CSS 1.0 or 2.0 specifications.

Nowadays things have changed a little bit. We are entering a new dynamic era of internet browsing. Browsers will be even more capable of serving and displaying media contents. Doing what? Correctly implementing the HTML 5 standard and the CSS 3.0 specifications.

HTML5Test

To help developers in the understanding and/or evaluation of the behavior of a browser, Niels Leenheer has written the HTML5Test web page. This page uses a little bit of Javascript to trick your browser with common HTML 5 implementation test cases, and collects all data in a really clean report. I suggest you to try that page now with your current browser, just to get an idea.

This test gives each browser a score, based on how many HTML 5 elements or features can handle correctly. The max score a browser can reach is 300, plus some additional bonus points for not-strictly-necessary features.

I gathered some results for the main web browsers, in the chart you can see below. I tried to use the more recent version for each browser. Just to get an appetizer of what will be next, I also tried a beta/alpha/nightly version of each of them.
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More Apple Store prices compared

I recently posted about a price comparison between European Apple Stores, and showing - or at least trying to show - how much Apple is gaining by selling overseas.

I will make use of the same tax rate estimated as computed in that article. Based on this assumption, I tried to discover how much is the gain for three Apple main products: the new Apple TV, the new Mac Mini and the MacBook.
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European Apple Store prices compared

Last Wednesdsay, we all know, Steve Jobs has made his last appearance "on stage" to present the biggest evolution ever in the iPods lineup. He also presented the latest evolution of the Apple TV, the new iOS 4.1 and the forthcoming iOS 4.2 for iPads.

But, the online Apple Store showed some little changes too. For the new iPods, on the European Apple sites you can read the actual product price, and also the taxes amount paid for that product. As an example, if you go to the spanish Apple Store and look for an iPod shuffle, you will see that its price is € 49, which includes € 11 for "VAT, duty and levies". Same story for the italian store, the french one, the english one, etc.

Some bloggers around the world, here and there, started comparing prices between the european stores and the american one, using the prices that Jobs kindly exposed to us. I too tried to make the same. Here is how, and later come the results.

Mean fee % estimation

I compared the prices of all the products, starting from the new prices of the iPod family. These products are the only ones for which we have the real price and the "real" fees. Starting from these ones I tried to calculate a mean fee percentage, which I will use in later comparisons. All the prices have been normalized, using the current EUR/USD, GBP/USD and CHF/USD changes, as shown on Google. I chose to compare prices from: Italy, France, Germany, UK, Spain and Switzerland. This is the result:

Estimated mean fees %


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